With the last of the earlier batch of frame castings now machined, progress is being made with permanently bolting them to the frames. To square up the frames, the bufferbeam stiffeners and the front buffer spring casings have been permanently fitted using the first of the 1065 driven and fitted bolts that have been acquired to assemble the frames.

Following experience with Tornado when we dismantled the buffer beam to bore the middle cylinder where some rust was found between the components, the decision has been made to “wet assemble” all the frame platework and frame stays. This is common practice in the aviation industry where sophisticated interfay compounds are routinely used in riveted aluminium alloy to inhibit corrosion.  After looking at several options, we have settled on using red metal primer as the interfay compound, as where it is squeezed of the joints, it makes an excellent base to ensure adhesion of subsequent layers of paint.  The sequence of photos shows Ian Matthews fitting the front bufferbeam. A coat of primer is applied to both mating surfaces and the components assembled and fully bolted together whilst the paint is wet.

07181507 Ian torques nuts on the buffer spring casing 28 7 15

Ian uses a torque wrench on nuts on the buffer spring casing – David Elliott

07181506 Bufferbeam stiffeners and buffer spring casings ready for bufferbeam fitting 28 7 15

Bufferbeam stiffeners and buffer spring casings ready for bufferbeam fitting – David Elliott

07181501 Ian applies primer to frame stays 28 7 15

Ian Matthews applies primer to frame stays – David Elliott

07181502 Ian applies primer to the back of the bufferbeam 28 7 15

Ian applies primer to the back of the bufferbeam – David Elliott

07181503 Lifting on the buffer beam 28 7 15

Lifting on the buffer beam – David Elliott

07181504 Inserting driven bolts with a copper hammer 28 7 15

Inserting driven bolts with a copper hammer – David Elliott

07181505 the buffer beam is on 28 7 15

The buffer beam is on – David Elliott